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The BLD & Associates, LLC Blog will provide topics about performance coaching, academic coaching, career development coaching, coaching for writing and coaching for growth.  The Blogs will also explore the Wisdom of Excellence in all these areas with case studies.

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Career Coaching versus Career Counseling

Posted on October 24, 2016 at 8:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Career Coaching versus Career Counseling

Rose M. Beane, Ph.D.

Emerging needs in the changing landscape of work settings have resulted in competing variables between Career Coaching and Career Counseling in the field of Career Development. This paper will outline the similarities and differences or the distinctions between career coaching and career counseling. The usefulness of skills and techniques used by counselors in the career counseling work versus a career coach, or as a mentor --- or other career choices.

Coaching is a rapidly emerging field pulling from the foundations of coaching in athletics (Hudson, 1999). Generally, coaching is defined in a personal and organizational context. Y Barry Chung and M Coleman Allen Gfroerer (2003) indicate that despite its increasing popularity, the concept of career coaching has been addressed only sparsely in the career development literature. However, there is a substantial overlap between career coaching and career counseling in the areas of career development. The goal of career coaching is to assist clients’ personal development within the context of work and career so that clients can:

• Better identify their skills’,

• Make better career choices, and

• Be more productive and valuable workers. (2003, p. 141)

Accordingly, career coaches serve as personal consultants for work related concerns such as work/life balance. Although, career coaches have their own certifications, they are criticized for practicing without a license. Finally, career coaching is not regulated by a specific code of ethics. Career coaching approaches are task and problem solving oriented and do not delve into the client’s past. A longer commitment is made to career coaching clients usually three (3) months to five (5) years. Career coaching is not affected by managed care. Finally, career coaches typically work with clients on how to better run a business or to improve job performance and productivity through focused strategies. Career coaching is distinctively a human resource function or activity and is narrowly focused (Feldman, 2001).

On the other hand, career counselors differ in significant ways from career coaches. Career counselors are trained as professional licensed counselors with specializations in career interventions (Chung & Gfroerer, 2003) . Career counseling has the following distinctions:

• Training programs are recognized by nationally recognized bodies (NBCC),

• National certificates or state licenses for counselors and counseling psychologists, and

• Relevant professional codes of ethics (ACA, NCDA, APA).

As a result, counseling professionals do not recognize career coaching as a comparable profession. In addition, career counseling uses psychological interventions in addition to problem solving and may use professional assessments and gather background information. There is a short-term commitment to treatment for career counseling clients. Career counseling may be impacted by managed care. Finally, although, career counselors may provide consultation to employers and managers they do not typically work with clients on how to better run a business. Career counseling is more broadly focused. (Chung & Gfroerer, 2003) (Chung & Gfroerer, 2003)

The similarities between career coaching and career counseling begin with both stressing a confidential work relationship with their clients. Career coaches and career counseling have a foundation in psychology and thereby transferrable skill sets. Chung and Gfroerer (2003) present a coaching/counseling example where the combined practice or integrated practice opportunities with business involving a process of assessment, goal setting, counseling aspects and communication skills. Finally, some career counselors are opting to take jobs with human resource departments as career coaches and transferring their skills and competencies to the fast growing area.

My sense is that the open market of globalization has secured the need for career coaching and career counseling and the need for a combined integrated approach to service the overwhelming need for work/life balance and developing leaders as well as productivity.

 

References

Chung, Y. B., & Gfroerer, M. C. (2003). Career coaching Practice, Training, Professional, and ethical Issues. The Career Development Quarterly , 141-152.

Feldman, D. C. (2001). Career coaching: What HR professionals and managers need to know. Human Resource Planning, 26-35.

Flaherty, J. (2010). Coaching: Evoking excellence in others. Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

Gallup, I. (2007). StrengthsQuest. Retrieved April 18, 2010, from StrengthsQuest: http://www.strengthsquest.com

Hargrove, R. (2008). Masterful Coaching, 3rd Edition. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Hudson, F. M. (1999). the Handbook of coaching: A comprehensive resource guide for managers, executives, consultants, and human resource professionals. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

 


 

Career Coaching versus Career Counseling

Posted on October 24, 2016 at 8:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Career Coaching versus Career Counseling

Rose M. Beane, Ph.D.

Emerging needs in the changing landscape of work settings have resulted in competing variables between Career Coaching and Career Counseling in the field of Career Development. This paper will outline the similarities and differences or the distinctions between career coaching and career counseling. The usefulness of skills and techniques used by counselors in the career counseling work versus a career coach, or as a mentor --- or other career choices.

Coaching is a rapidly emerging field pulling from the foundations of coaching in athletics (Hudson, 1999). Generally, coaching is defined in a personal and organizational context. Y Barry Chung and M Coleman Allen Gfroerer (2003) indicate that despite its increasing popularity, the concept of career coaching has been addressed only sparsely in the career development literature. However, there is a substantial overlap between career coaching and career counseling in the areas of career development. The goal of career coaching is to assist clients’ personal development within the context of work and career so that clients can:

• Better identify their skills’,

• Make better career choices, and

• Be more productive and valuable workers. (2003, p. 141)

Accordingly, career coaches serve as personal consultants for work related concerns such as work/life balance. Although, career coaches have their own certifications, they are criticized for practicing without a license. Finally, career coaching is not regulated by a specific code of ethics. Career coaching approaches are task and problem solving oriented and do not delve into the client’s past. A longer commitment is made to career coaching clients usually three (3) months to five (5) years. Career coaching is not affected by managed care. Finally, career coaches typically work with clients on how to better run a business or to improve job performance and productivity through focused strategies. Career coaching is distinctively a human resource function or activity and is narrowly focused (Feldman, 2001).

On the other hand, career counselors differ in significant ways from career coaches. Career counselors are trained as professional licensed counselors with specializations in career interventions (Chung & Gfroerer, 2003) . Career counseling has the following distinctions:

• Training programs are recognized by nationally recognized bodies (NBCC),

• National certificates or state licenses for counselors and counseling psychologists, and

• Relevant professional codes of ethics (ACA, NCDA, APA).

As a result, counseling professionals do not recognize career coaching as a comparable profession. In addition, career counseling uses psychological interventions in addition to problem solving and may use professional assessments and gather background information. There is a short-term commitment to treatment for career counseling clients. Career counseling may be impacted by managed care. Finally, although, career counselors may provide consultation to employers and managers they do not typically work with clients on how to better run a business. Career counseling is more broadly focused. (Chung & Gfroerer, 2003) (Chung & Gfroerer, 2003)

The similarities between career coaching and career counseling begin with both stressing a confidential work relationship with their clients. Career coaches and career counseling have a foundation in psychology and thereby transferrable skill sets. Chung and Gfroerer (2003) present a coaching/counseling example where the combined practice or integrated practice opportunities with business involving a process of assessment, goal setting, counseling aspects and communication skills. Finally, some career counselors are opting to take jobs with human resource departments as career coaches and transferring their skills and competencies to the fast growing area.

My sense is that the open market of globalization has secured the need for career coaching and career counseling and the need for a combined integrated approach to service the overwhelming need for work/life balance and developing leaders as well as productivity.

 

References

Chung, Y. B., & Gfroerer, M. C. (2003). Career coaching Practice, Training, Professional, and ethical Issues. The Career Development Quarterly , 141-152.

Feldman, D. C. (2001). Career coaching: What HR professionals and managers need to know. Human Resource Planning, 26-35.

Flaherty, J. (2010). Coaching: Evoking excellence in others. Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

Gallup, I. (2007). StrengthsQuest. Retrieved April 18, 2010, from StrengthsQuest: http://www.strengthsquest.com

Hargrove, R. (2008). Masterful Coaching, 3rd Edition. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Hudson, F. M. (1999). the Handbook of coaching: A comprehensive resource guide for managers, executives, consultants, and human resource professionals. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

 


 

Student Retention 7.0

Posted on August 17, 2016 at 7:05 PM Comments comments (0)

This article is the first of series presenting a 7-Component Retention Model (Beane, 2016) borrowing from Vincent Tinto’s Retention Model (Tinto, 1975).

The Retention 7.0 Model integrates non-cognitive factors based on the Dilts Logical Levels of Learning and Intervention (Dilts, 2016) which includes dispositional factors that must be considered in the overall quest for student achievement and success which include:

      • Identity (Who?),
      • Beliefs (values and assumptions [Why?]),
      • Capabilities (competence, skills [How?]),
      • Behavior (What/?, and
      • Environment (Where?).

 All students bring this life experience luggage with them to campus.


Dilts Nested Levels of Learning and Intervention Model – based on the levels of learning which are nestled beginning with identity; beliefs, values, assumptions; behaviors; environment. The recommendation for intervention for learning should occur at the level of identity and beliefs versus capabilities and behavior. When we intervene at the level of identity, we can influence beliefs and thereby capabilities and behaviors by creating learning environment community building.

The seven components are:

      1. Early Alert System
      2. Point-of-Contact Documentation System
      3. Referral/ Feedback System
      4. Academic Success Monitoring
      5. Learning & Intervention Strategies
      6. Collaboration System
      7. Transition Support

 

This is represented by a continuing sequence of stages, tasks, or events illustrated in a circular flow. Emphasizing the connection between all components with equal weight given for each stage to yield desired outcomes. Each component will be explained later.

 

 Foundations for Effectiveness

The staff team accountable for retention of minorities, first generation students, at-risk students must develop a common identity and a teachable point of view for buy-in and ownership for the integration process based on a clear foundation for effectiveness. To do this the staff and faculty must come to the table to provide feedback and to build that common identity and the teachable point of view going forward. This ensures consistency in the team development and ownership in the foundations for effectiveness process which includes the team as well the students who are recipients of the interventions. Staff teams may involve: Multicultural or Diversity (special initiatives), federal Trio Program staff (McNair, Student Support Services, etc.), Counseling, Financial Aid, Learning Center(s) and other pertinent partnering programs and departments on campus by various names and last but not least faculty and developmental course faculty.

 This synergy of the following assumptions will facilitate a common identity and belief for integration based on the:

 

  • 4 – Pillars of College Success: a) High expectations for students, b) Building Community and helping students learn how to work in groups; c) It takes a researcher to produce a researcher – that is an expert can produce another expert; d) People willing as faculty to work with students helping them to make the connections along the way. [Hrabrowski Freeman, Maryland University, STEM]
  • Growth Mindset – based on Carol Dweck’s research and belief that your basic qualities are things that you can cultivate through effort and everyone can change and grow through application and experience. (Stanford University)
  • Effectiveness - based on Peter Drucker’s leadership philosophy that everyone can learn to be effective.

 

To expand and perfect this concept and approach for synergy, collaboration and common identity, it is necessary to invite all minority staff and faculty to provide feedback to the foundations for effectiveness for a holistic view point that supports ownership from all servicing groups that will come along side and add-value to the process of equipping and retaining the target students.

Based on this 7-Component Retention construct, integration might be implemented as follows which included needs assessments, non-cognitive assessments, structured contacts, learning theories and strategies, building community and career and academic planning:


 1. Early Alert

  The Early Alert System involves getting a head start on the intervention window in the student life cycle in the first three (3) to six (6) weeks of the student’s first semester of the first year and progressively the same window of time in the student’s second year as the intervention window. This component involves Enrollment Services and the process of recruitment, enrollment, and orientation to campus life.

To get a head start in view of a student’s self-efficacy and academic self-concept the recommendation would be to engage students in an experience that intervenes at the level of their identity and beliefs, assumptions, and values (Dilts Nested Levels of Learning and Intervention Model). An intervention planned for the first weekend of the first week of classes [or prior to the first week of classes] is recommended. Since these factors play a major role in college retention it requires early alert.

This intervention initiative will build a learning community where the non-cognitive assessments will be conducted to inform and empower students at the level of identity and beliefs, assumptions, and values.

      • StrengthsFinder 2.0
      • Emotional Intelligence 2.0
      • Learning Styles Inventory
      • Multiple Intelligences
      • Personal Statement – Goal Statement for College completion – Growth Plan
      • ETS Assessment

These non-cognitive assessments present a context and content to coach students towards the pathway of self-efficacy as a foundation for academic engagement, social engagement, academic self- concept and a growth mindset through the student life cycle. The implementation would be during an early alert weekend.

The outcome of the intervention would be:

 Students discover their top five (5) strengths;

      • Students discover their emotional intelligence quotient and strategies to strengthen their self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management skills;
      • Students identify their learning style preference; and
      • Students identify the predominant multiple intelligences how they impact their brain processing.
      • Students compose a personal statement of the short and long-term goals towards college completion.
      • Students learn and are equipped to leverage diversity and multiculturalism.

  2. Point-of-Contact Documentation

  This involves the content of Structured Contacts with the staff accountable for student retention, advising, and other university resources to maintain student monitoring and a common data base in support of the retention and intervention function.

Structured Contacts must be a major component of point-of-contact documentation for success monitoring in the context of a coaching approach rather than an academic advising approach. The coaching approach will always provide support from a goal oriented position with the goal of graduation as the end result. The coach approach provides a performance outcome based pathway for the retention support staff to develop skills in two major coaching areas: cognitive coaching and performance coaching which involve:

 

      • InsideOut Coaching (Performance Oriented)
      • Cognitive Coaching (Goal Oriented – Educational Thinking partners)
      • Peer-to- Peer Coaching
      • Peer-to-Peer Tutoring
      • Coachee’s Agenda – Students set the agenda as they learn the process

 

Faculty Office Hour Meeting(s) – Students will be required to set-up an Introductory Meeting with their course and major faculty and to facilitate and follow-up with Content and Progress Meetings with specific course faculty as appropriate for progress monitoring.

3. Referral/ Feedback System

This involves the collaboration with College and University resources that assist with the intrventions with support services to address the full spectrum of student needs for academic preparation, academic engagement and career preparation.

 

      • Writing Center
      • Center for Academic Achievement
      • Career Services
      • Library/ Learning Services
      • Scholarships and Financial Aid
      • Disability Services
      • Registrar
      • Multicultural Services
      • Academic Advising
      • Student Life / Student Organizations

 

Career and Academic Planning must be an integral part of the foundations for effectiveness as students in the target populations are generally undecided or have decided on a major that is not aligned with identified strengths to ensure academic confidence and efficacy.

 4. Academic Success Monitoring System

Academic Success Monitoring involves following the student through the student life cycle and determining where interventions are necessary to foster persistence and to ensure retention of the target student(s) for completion of the respective program of study and the culminating outcome being established as graduation. This also involves point-of-contact documentation for common records.

 

      • Establish Student Common File(s)
      • Establish a personal three-five year strategic plan
      • Establish a Virtual Learning Community –utilizing the existing course software
      • Establish an Academic Plan for setting goals, objectives, and outcomes
      • Establish Academic Progress Reports at specific intervals to promote success
      • Establishing collaboration and partnerships with Faculty for gateway courses, general education requirements as well as academic major’s prerequisites

 

 5. Employ Learning and Intervention Strategies

This component assist students in navigating the college system through proven strategies both for learning and intervention levels to learn the “rules of engagement” in the academic system, social system, and progression through the systems.

 

      • Cooperative and collaborative learning group development for engagement in groups in the classroom and study groups outside the classroom. Providing support for informal cohorts to support the foundations for effectiveness especially a growth mindset.
      • Tutoring – utilizing the peer tutors to teach concept maps and thinking maps as learning techniques and tools. Promoting the Writing Center and Center for Academic Achievement and Math Centers as resources for learning and effectiveness.
      • StrengthsFinder Assessment
      • Emotional Intelligence Assessment
      • Multiple Intelligence Assessment
      • Study Groups and Study Hours
      • Mastering course software for Online Course work activity

Learning Theories and Intervention Strategies are an important component of the foundations of effectiveness. Staff, Faculty as wells Students in the target group need to have an understanding of these theories in the practical sense to help them to understand how they learn best and the best way to adapt to the academic culture in the classroom which involve:

  

      • Adult Learning Principles
      • Self-Directed Learning
      • Cooperative & Collaborative Learning
      • Thinking and Cognitive Maps
      • Dilts Nested Levels of Learning & Intervention
      • Braining Processing (Critical Thinking, Focus, Attention)

 

 6. College and University Resources Collaboration System

Ongoing collaboration and partnerships must be maintained between and among College and University support services to provide consistency of support for the spectrum of student needs which involve academic preparation and academic efficacy. In some instances as appropriate there should be a collaboration agreement prepared so that all staffs are operating from the same understandings in terms of referrals, study hours, and the opportunity for innovative arrangements that contribute to the emerging academic needs for the target populations:

 

      • Writing Center
      • Center for Academic Achievement
      • Career Services
      • Library/ Learning Services
      • Scholarships and Financial Aid
      • Disability Services
      • Registrar
      • Multicultural Services/ Diversity Programs 
      • Academic Advising
      • Career Services
      • Student Life/ Student Organizations [Affinity Groups]

 

Career and Academic Planning is a major component in retention intervention strategies. Students in the target population need to be coached through the development of the following components of the foundations for effectiveness:

 

      • Career Exploration & Decision Making
      • A Growth Plan/ Personal Strategic Plan
      • A Personal Statement
      • An Academic Plan
      • Study Aboard Opportunities

 

 

7. Transition Support System

As a student transition through the student life cycle pass the early alert window there are some distinct supports that must be employed when following the foundations for effectiveness as a pathway for transition to completing a program of study with the culminating goal of graduation. Who students become is up to us. This function involves the staff team accountable for retention and graduation in collaboration with College and University Resources:

Building Community

The target group of students must experience a sense of belonging as they struggle with identity, roles and responsibility, integration into the academic culture and navigating the campus culture as a fluent participant accepting code-switching as a strategy to leverage their diversity on campus in preparation for a global society.

Diversity

Multiculturalism as defined by the Student Services Handbook for the Profession states:

Multiculturalism is a state of being in which an individual feels comfortable and communicates effectively with people from any culture, in any situation, because she or he has developed the necessary knowledge and skills to do so.

The transition through building community has this outcome.

The foundations for effectiveness provides a non-cognitive layer which involves:

 

      •  Leadership Development
      • Teambuilding
      • Group Development
      • Leveraging Diversity
      • Service Learning/ Experiential Learning/ Volunteerism
      • Faculty Mentoring

  Alumni Assessments is a critical component for a backend survey of students who complete their program of student and persist through the student life cycle at SVSU successfully. This information is critical to leveraging and learning from what the target population already does well and what the University is already doing well.

 

      • Graduate Survey of Minority and First Generation Students
      • Compile Stories of Target Students and what influenced their persistence
      • Compile Factors promoting Retention and program completion
      • Diagraming the Anatomy of Retaining Target Students

 

This action research will help to determine, who is successful and why? We can gain insight into how students perceive navigating the college system and replicate the findings using the foundations for effectiveness.

The next article in the series will unpack each of the seven components of Retention 7.0.

 

Choice: The Difference Maker

Posted on July 12, 2016 at 7:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Choice:  The Difference Maker

by Rose M. Lataillade-Beane

“Choice is single-handedly the most powerful & creative part of the human mind.” (Dr. Caroline Leaf, neuroscientist). Today, choice is the one human endeavor that all manner of inquirers want to know, how it works and how it can be influenced to benefit mankind. Today, one person’s choice has the propensity to go viral with social media considering all its options (snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, twitter, etc.). Choice is the most extraordinary power we yield as an individual, group, corporation, nation, or world. Choice remains an extraordinary responsibility. Whatever the choice may be, it has its own consequences for the individual, to and to extended global village connected by technologies.

 

Choice is the synthesis of all the faculties of the mind [intellect, emotions, imaginations, will] to action based on the minds assessment of the options at hand. Whatever we choose we bear the consequences today, next week, in 30 days, six months, a year, in three years, in five years and for the rest of our lives. A choice is always for the individual to make and the consequences must be weighed against the other factors of one’s personal and professional life. You, the Chooser is the difference-maker

 

The components of Emotional Intelligence [Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness, & Relationship Management] provide some tools that can enhance decision-making for both your personal and professional life. This involves taking the Emotional Intelligence Assessment which is a great return on investment of $20 to complete it online and $30 to purchase the book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0 (Bradberry & Greaves, 2009). The assessment profile is a great tool to locate how you fair in each component and then you can use the prescribed strategies to increase your scores as an ongoing growth project. This is provided online or in the book, however, the assessment is taken online for both options. Consider the following:


 

Self-Awareness is as powerful as choice. Self-Awareness will provide the crucial data needed for every single choice. Pay attention to who you are…it is a guaranteed return on your investment.


 

Self-Management is the actions of Choice. Self-Management manifest your choices as behavior. Pay attention to how you present who you are…it is your character & integrity on display and is a worthwhile return on your investment.


 

Social Awareness is opening your mind to people, cultures, and opportunities.  Social Awareness is the choices you make as you relate to people, cultures, and opportunities in the world. Who do people say you are? It is worth cultivating the return you can make on this investment.


 

Relationship Management is a synthesis of choice, self-awareness, self-management, and social awareness. Do you keep relationships over time in your personal and professional life? This component ensures that you communicate in ways people can accept and understand and negotiates every interaction. Strengthening this component ensures lasting returns on your Emotional Intelligence investments.


 

Choice is the power you control for personal and professional decision-making and problem-solving.  My recommendation is that you invest in the Emotional Intelligence assessment to supplement  your growth plan for both your personal and professional life.  Also, my recommendation is that you hire a performance coach as a great partner to help you unpack these components as it relates to choice, quality decision-making and problem-solving for personal and professional development.

 

Thesis & Dissertations Without Tears

Posted on June 24, 2016 at 4:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Thesis and Dissertations Without Tears

by Rose M. Beane, Ph.D.

When writing a thesis or a dissertation, there are several things to consider to ensure that the process is not overwhelmed with tears:


• Two important Tips

• Writing in the Discipline

• Research and Literature Review of the Topic

• Research Methods

• Documenting the Findings

• Organizing the Work

• Resources


When I was on my journey to the doctorate, I received a piece of advice that really served me well. I also found a reference book that demystified the process into a practical, doable task. I will share this wisdom in the hopes that it might allow your process to continue without too many tears and writer’s block. Keep in mind, that what I will share will be way beyond the selection of your committee (whose members each have their own opinions of what your right of passage should be depending on their perspectives.). The committee is quite another matter and you absolutely must learn the rules of engagement for their unique mix and the tensions that arise.


The thesis and dissertation process is a very self-directed, self-motivated, and self-regulated process that requires self-management. The whole aspect of emotional intelligence comes into play (Bradberry & Greaves, 2009) (Goleman, 2006):


  • Self-Awareness – you must have a secure identity of yourself in your field, genre, and discipline and the triggers that may set you off to quit when it is not in your best interest or a return on your investment.


  • Self-Management – you must be able to handle your emotions and the resulting behaviors to facilitate rather than interfere with the task at hand and delay gratification to pursue the goal, Dr.____;  ______ Ph.D.;  _____, M.A.;  _____M.ED.


  • Social Awareness – you must be able to listen and observe on multiple levels and read the politics of your advisor, committee and discipline and perceive what they are thinking and feeling during your interactions. You need to handle your emotions in these relationships and accurately read the social situations and networks. Actually, isn’t this what qualitative research is all about, listening and observing and following the rules of engagement.


  • Relationship Management – you must be able to use your awareness of your emotions and those of others to manage interactions over time ensuring clear communication and handling conflict while building a bond under stressful situations. You will need these relationships and network of colleagues after accomplishing the goal of a Masters or Doctorate.

It is not for the faint of heart. Otherwise, the path would not be crowded with the road kill of “ABD’s” (all but the dissertation). The “Emotional Intelligence 2.0’ book is available through Barnes and Noble bookstores for about $25-$30 (make sure the sealed envelope at the back of the book is in tack which provides the code to go online and complete the emotional intelligence assessment). You can also go online to www.TalentSmart.com and purchase the assessment for approximately $20. The results provide the customized strategies that will help you increase your scores (quotient). I recommend this coaching advice because the thesis and dissertation process on all levels is an emotionally challenging process even if one has all the technical skills of the field.

All in all, there are some basic mechanics that you must discipline yourself to negotiate and they are:

 

  • Big Picture and Details
  • Time Management
  • Grammar & Style
  • Writing & Editing
  • Formatting and Organization

 

These basic must be in place without question, otherwise you should consider a “Writing Coach” to help you scaffold through the process and bridge the support for your areas of strength. All author’s during their development benefit from hiring a Writing & Editing Coach. A ghost writer is not appropriate in this credentialing process. However, it is honorable and wise to hire a Writing Coach.

You can use the course work along the way to your advantage, especially in this age of technology. Which by the way, brings me to the first tip I was given when I was interviewing for a residence life graduate assistantship in the first semester of my doctoral pursuit.


Tip #1 – You already have written a hundred pages in your discipline if you count all the papers you have written [10-15 pages] in your Master’s program or Doctoral Program [depending on where you are in the process]. To ensure that this tip works to your advantage, as much as it is possible when given a course writing assignment, use or align it with your thesis or dissertation topic. In this way, you will get a head start on your literature review. The technology of word processing (Office, etc.) allows you to catalog the references and store each writing document to cut and past when you are writing your thesis or dissertation. If you are able to negotiate this tip, a great deal of the work will have been completed and you are ahead of the game.


Tip #2 - The second tip that I discovered was the resource book entitled, “Completing your Doctoral Dissertation or Master’s Thesis in Two Semesters or Less,” by Evelyn Hunt Ogden. This resource can be obtained as an investment through Amazon for Kindle ($29.50) which allows you to download a sample (you may want to review the book) or the list price is approximately $40.00. In my opinion, it is worth the investment and it is a doable challenge.


All the items that I listed above that you should consider can be found by researching “Writing in the Disciplines.” The specifics of your discipline should be explored with your thesis or dissertation advisor or the chairperson of your department. They can provide various resources to guide your journey. My recommendation is to research writing in the disciplines and adhere to the rules of engagement:


Writing in the Discipline – All academic disciplines require you to answer a question and support your assertion with different types of research [qualitative or quantitative]. Papers in all academic disciplines often include the following components (chapters): abstract, introduction, review of the literature, research methods, findings, and conclusion. Specifically, all disciplines rely on certain familiar patterns of organizing material: history/chronologically, science/process, etc. Thesis and Dissertation writers must be clear what their discipline patterns of writing are and adhere to the style, organization and format. It is a good idea to research writing in the Humanities, writing in Social Sciences, and writing in the Sciences and note the assignments, arguments, conventions of style and format, documentation formats (APA, MLA), and sample papers. Writing in the Discipline titles are available on Amazon prices ranging to $100 or you can rent the text books for as little as $15.


Finally, develop a personal strategic plan, a timeline for the process.  Writing is the name of the game and that is the hardest part sometimes. You must commit to writing at least one-hour or more a day.  Set a convenient time and be relentless.  Delay immediate gratification until you get the job done.  Reward yourslef at milestones during the process.  I had a full-time job when I was working on my dissertation and a five year old son and husband who had needs.  My opportune time was to write in the quiet of the night and sometimes all night.  You have to "get at it" as they say.  Also, I used some special music which  had the effect of triggering my energy (Yanni).  I can't really tell you how it works except that it focused me to get in the zone of writing.  Do whatever it takes because it is worth it.


I believe this will be helpful to you. Your thoughts…      


 

An Invitation to Hire a Performance Coach

Posted on June 12, 2016 at 4:05 AM Comments comments (0)

An Invitation to Hire a Performance Coach

by Rose M. Beane, Ph.D.

Are you at an impasse? Do you want to move ahead but can’t find a way forward? Alan Fine (2010) in his book, “You Already Know how to Be Great” said in his coaching invitation, “As you will discover, this book is less about gaining new knowledge and more about getting rid of what’s keeping you from using the knowledge you already have. It’s less about doing new things and more about understanding and giving language and order to some of the great things you already do, so you can do those things consistently and with better results.”Brendon Burchand (2014) in his book “The Motivation Manifesto” declared, “There comes a time in the lives of those destined for greatness when we must stand before the mirror of meaning and ask: Why, having been endowed with the courageous heart of a lion, do we live as mice?”

 

Did you know, that the power to improve your performance resides within you? As an adult learner --- you are intrinsically motivated, you are self-directed, you have a reservoir of experience, you are problem-centered, and you are solution-focused. Whatever the situation, circumstance or issue is that you need to jump start, it is doable. Evidence-based performance analyst tell us that a majority of people when faced with the scenario, “if my life (job) depends on it” can and will perform which means there is no deficiency of knowledge (skill, capability) only a deficiency of execution (taking the action). The mark of a leader --- is to know when and whom to ask for help. A performance coach can help you identify the interference and draw out your latent potential.

 The aim of coaching is “sustained cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes that facilitate goal attainment and performance enhancement, either in one’s work or in one’s personal life” (Stober, Grant, & Editors, 2006). A performance coach will help you:  

 

  • focus,
  • articulate the goals and objectives you will achieve,
  • reality check your perspective of the situation,
  • identify and prioritize your options,
  • analyze your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) 

 

to help you plan and intentionally take action to achieve the desired outcomes. The performance coach will come along side to help you build the platform to launch your way forward and shape new visions and plans. You can start tapping into your destined greatness today and discover new energy and purpose. Try it, the advantage is a tangible return on the investment!


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